Posts Tagged ‘Hood Installation’

Vent Systems Replacement in Colorado

How Often Do Each of Your Vent Systems Need to be Replaced?

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Orange County, CA – The ventilation system in your commercial kitchen or food prep facility can prevent the air from becoming polluted and can also prevent fires. If you have recently installed your vent hoods or it’s been a couple years, replacement isn’t likely. Even in the busiest of kitchens, these components are designed to last years into the future, and many come with warranties that protect against the risk of fan breakdowns and other anomalies.
Yet if you have had your vent hood system for fifteen years or more, you may want to consider a replacement. Here are the signs to look for when you’re wondering if a new vent system may be worthy of your investment.

Signs to Replace Your Vent Hoods


Tons of Grease Buildup

If anything will catch on fire quickly, it’s a grease-laden vent system. When grease gets caked into your fans and vents and throughout the various components that comprise your system, the slightest spark can create a dangerous situation you won’t want to encounter.
To save your employees, equipment, building, and customers, keep your ventilation system free of grease at every turn. While some buildup is normal during the average shift, too much is a hazard. Use a heavy duty cleaner nightly and schedule regular vent hood cleaning and maintenance to keep your equipment grease-free.
If the grease builds up over a long period of time, it can turn into an uncleanable mess, and replacement might be your best and least-costly option in the long run.

Working Too Hard

If your vent system is huffing and puffing and yet seems to be pushing even less air through than before, that’s a good sign that your vent system needs to be overhauled or replaced. In some cases, a simple fan replacement can do wonders, but only a professional ventilation hood expert should make that call.
Scheduling regular maintenance can keep the problem of not enough airflow in check, but outdated systems may be helpless and replacement may be your only recourse.

Changes in Production

If you have recently changed your menu or if you are suddenly producing more volume in your kitchen, your old vent hood system may not be able to keep up. This isn’t something you want to find out weeks into the new way of doing business.
It’s far better to schedule a maintenance and cleaning call if you do suspect that your equipment isn’t in the best working order before things get out of hand. New and energy-efficient vent hoods by top manufacturers will keep production ramping up without sacrificing quality, and you’ll even save on energy costs.

Changing Your Vent Hood Filter

Of course, some ventilation systems can seem to be malfunctional when changing your filter is all the situation calls for. Make sure you are changing or at least cleaning your hood filters regularly to prevent grease buildup and other problems. And, of course, to keep your ventilation system operating like new.

Conclusion

The bottom line is that you should never make the decision to replace your vent hoods all on your own. Get an expert’s opinion by scheduling regular vent hood cleaning and maintenance or by calling for a free estimate on a complete replacement. Only a professional will be able to give you an honest assessment on whether your equipment needs to be maintained, fixed, or replaced altogether.

For more information on vent hood maintenance, cleaning, and replacement, visit Aps-Hoods, your choice for commercial kitchen ventilation systems, food truck construction, and more.

© 2018 Millionairium and Farazandeh. Authorization to post is granted, with the stipulation that Millionairium and Farazandeh are credited as sole source. Linking to other sites from this document is strictly prohibited, with the exception of herein imbedded links.

Classifications of Fire Extinguishers

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Salt Lake City, UT – The majority of restaurateurs understand the importance of fire safety in a commercial kitchen. A single fire outbreak has the potential to cost tens of thousands of dollars in damage to a commercial kitchen. There is also the risk of causing injury or loss of life if the fire is not quickly and effectively controlled.

Fire systems require much more attention than simply installing a fire extinguisher beside the deep fryer or cooktop. Fires can be sparked by a number of different sources within a kitchen, some of which may require specialized fire systems to extinguish properly.

There are several different classifications of fire extinguishers, each suited to fighting fires sparked by different sources.

How Fire Extinguisher Classifications Work



Labels on the front of each fire extinguisher display letters that outline the type of fire each system is suited to fight. The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) defines three classes of common fires and another two specialty classes. These are:

Class A – Used to combat fires sparked by common combustible sources such as paper, cardboard boxes, or wood.

Class B – Used to fight high-heat fires fueled by flammable liquids, including gasoline, paint, oil, and other solvents.

Class C – Used to extinguish electrical fires that may have been caused by appliances or motors.

Class D – Used specifically for fighting fires that involve combustible metals, such as titanium, sodium, magnesium or potassium that have the potential to react violently if doused with water or other chemicals.

Class K – Used specifically for combating fires sparked in cooking appliances or that involve cooking fats or vegetable oils.

Standard dry chemicals found in common fire extinguishers are ineffective when trying to extinguish fires in modern cooking appliances, so using specialized fire extinguishers is crucial for improving kitchen safety.

Aside from having the correct fire extinguishers and other fire suppression systems in place, commercial kitchen owners can reduce the risk of fire by regularly cleaning and inspecting hood installations, changing grease filters often, and checking that any flammable liquids or chemical solutions are stored properly away from stoves or cooking equipment.

All commercial kitchens are required to adhere to national fire testing standard UL-300, which was designed to ensure fires are safely controlled and maintained. A professional fire system service can provide peace of mind that your kitchen’s fire system installation is up to code and that you have the correct classifications of fire extinguishers to suit your kitchen’s needs.

For professional fire system service, hood installation, maintenance, and cleaning, call APS-Hoods at (800)750-7313, now serving customers in Denver, Salt Lake City, Cheyenne, Phoenix, Wyoming, and other across the U.S.

© 2017 Millionairium and Farazandeh. Authorization to post is granted, with the stipulation that Millionairium and Farazandeh are credited as sole source. Linking to other sites from this document is strictly prohibited, with the exception of herein imbedded links.
Signs Your Vent Hood Fans Need Cleaning

Signs Your Vent Hood Fans Need Cleaning and/or Replacement

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Denver, CO – Most restaurant owners understand the importance of engaging in a regular commercial kitchen cleaning schedule. Keeping cooktops and food preparation areas spotless is crucial for hygiene reasons, but it’s equally as important to ensure that kitchen hood fans and filters remain just as clean. Here’s why.

Grease and dust can build up in range hood fans and filters quickly, posing a potential fire hazard. Grease is highly combustible, so the risk of it catching alight and sparking a kitchen fire are increased if the residue build-up isn’t removed regularly.

The kitchen’s hood and ventilation system provide a layer of protection in eliminating air contaminants and odors caused by cooking. So it’s essential the filters and fans are not just cleaned and maintained regularly so they operate effectively; they also need to be cleaned properly, ideally by a professional hood services company, to minimize health and safety risks.

However, even with regular maintenance, there are times when a hood fan or filter will need to be replaced completely. Some signs to look for that could indicate a hood fan or filter may need to be replaced include:
  • You notice damage on the filter during a routine cleaning
  • The vent fan no longer draws smoke or cooking smells out of the kitchen as effectively
  • The exhaust fan makes unusual sounds or stops turning completely
The risk of an exhaust fan failing during operating hours could be devastating to any commercial kitchen operation. The risk of fire is dramatically increased, but there is also the problem of filling the kitchen and dining area with smoke.

The specialists at APS-Hoods recommend creating a scheduled routine for cleaning, maintaining and replacing hood filters in every commercial kitchen. The actual length of time between each deep clean, service and replacement will vary, depending on the condition of the individual range hood.

A ventilation hood over a busy restaurant kitchen may have filters that need to be replaced every six to eight months. However, that timeframe may shorten if the range hood, duct work and fan are not cleaned and maintained regularly.

The majority of commercial kitchen owners simply don’t have the available staff or resources to undertake such a detailed task. In fact, most eateries need their staff to focus on what they do best – cooking great meals and serving satisfied customers.

The easiest and most effective way to ensure that any kitchen’s hood, exhaust and ventilation system is operating at its best is to book a complete hood service and duct cleaning. Appointing a professional company to take care of the cleaning allows you to keep your staff focused on their jobs. You also have the peace of mind that the job is done properly and any faulty or damaged parts can be repaired or replaced quickly.

To learn more about cleaning the filters in a commercial kitchen, contact Aps-Hoods for a free estimate by calling (800) 750-7313.

About Aps-Hoods: Aps-Hoods specializes in services such as complete kitchen cleaning, hood installation, and fire protection services in Denver, Cheyenne, as well as across Colorado, Arizona, California, and Wyoming.

© 2017 Millionairium and Farazandeh. Authorization to post is granted, with the stipulation that Millionairium and Farazandeh are credited as sole source. Linking to other sites from this document is strictly prohibited, with the exception of herein imbedded links.
Fire Restaurant Safety Tips Los Angeles, CA

What You Need to Know About Fire Restaurant Safety


Salt Lake City, UT – While restaurants bring a lot of people joy, the fact is they are highly dangerous places. The kitchen is the culprit. Hot equipment, flames, chemicals, and paper products increase the risks of fire significantly. The National Fire Protection Association reports that thousands of establishments report fires every year to the tune of hundreds of thousands of dollars per year.

In other words, as a restaurant owner, a fire could cost you a significant amount of money and could cost you your business altogether. It’s not worth the risk, especially when there are ways to prevent restaurant fires. Here are the steps to take.

Install a Fire-Suppression System

A fire suppression system releases chemicals when it detects a fire. The chemicals suppress the flames, and the system automatically turns off the electrical supply.

Keep Class K Extinguishers Within Arm’s Reach

Place K Extinguishers near all areas where fires could start, such as near the stoves and ovens. ABC extinguishers are best for areas where paper, wood, and electrical fires could occur.

Schedule Inspections Regularly

Inspections ensure everything is in good working order and there are no fire risks. They should be conducted quarterly unless your restaurant is a high-volume operation. >

If your kitchen has wood or charcoal burning ovens, you should schedule monthly inspections.

Train Your Staff

Fire safety training for staff is important. All staff should have a refresher every six months.

Training should include:
  • How to clean up grease
  • How to deal with a grease fire
  • How to remove ashes
  • Where to store flammable liquids
  • The importance of keeping areas tidy
  • An emergency plan

Maintenance Is Important

You should have all equipment maintained at least every six months. A fire safety professional can check for any loose or frayed wires and broken switch plates. A report will identify any fire hazards you’ll need to take care of to pass inspection.

Schedule Maintenance to Prevent Restaurant Fires

Is it time for a maintenance and fire safety inspection appointment? Contact APS-Hoods for professional cleaning, maintenance, and fire protection services. We can protect your business by ensuring your kitchen’s equipment and setup have a low risk of fire. Call us today at 800-750-7313 for a free quote.

© 2017 Millionairium and Farazandeh. Authorization to post is granted, with the stipulation that Millionairium and Farazandeh are credited as sole source. Linking to other sites from this document is strictly prohibited, with the exception of herein imbedded links.
Fire Suppression Systems

Are Your Fire Suppression Systems Compliant?


Los Angeles, CA – Commercial kitchen facilities are required to uphold fire testing standard UL-300, a policy that has been in place since 1994. UL stands for Underwriters Laboratories, the organization that created the rules to help commercial kitchens deal with and control property and life-threatening fires.

To earn UL 300 certification, which is necessary to secure a Property Insurance policy, Underwriters Laboratories must test and certify each piece of fire suppression equipment independently. The goal is to help restaurants reduce the risk of fires by ensuring that all cooking equipment and the kitchen setup minimizes the collection of grease in the duct-work and the air. Fire extinguishing equipment must also be adequate in handling the severely hot temperatures that can be found in most commercial kitchen equipment.

UL-300 Certification

Before 1994, most commercial cooking operations used animal fat and deep fryers that were poorly insulated, resulting in inconsistent and inefficient cooking temperatures. In those days, kitchens used dry chemical systems that would smother a fire if one were to break out.

Modern Fire Suppression Systems

These days, kitchens have done away with animal fat and have instead turned to vegetable oils, which tend to heat to cooking temperatures more quickly. The deep fryers used in today’s kitchens retain heat more efficiently and are well-insulated. However, dry chemical systems are no longer used, as they are incapable of extinguishing fires and keeping them extinguished.

UL-300 calls for the use of wet chemical fire suppression systems, which serve two primary purposes. First, UL-300 systems still smother fires similar to the way dry chemical extinguishers did. Second, they are designed to cool the liquids so that the fire doesn’t re-ignite, something dry systems were unequipped to do.

UL-300 Requirements

If you hope for your commercial kitchen to pass inspection, the following requirements will need to be put into place.

  • Fire extinguishing nozzles should be located in all hoods and ducts, as well as above each cooking appliance.
  • All gas and electrical power sources should have automatic fuel shutoff capabilities.
  • A manual shutoff pull station should be available for all power sources.
  • You should have at least one wet chemical fire extinguishing system that adheres to UL-300 (and that is checked semi-annually by a certified professional).
  • All hoods and ductwork should be maintained and cleaned semi-annually by an authorized service company.
  • Grease filters should be cleaned on a weekly basis.

NFPA 96

NFPA stands for National Fire Prevention Association, an organization that works to prevent fires in commercial kitchens, and other cooking facilities. NFPA 96 is a publication that outlines the safety guidelines that restaurant owners can put in place to reduce fire risk.

The guidelines include the proper distance and angles for installing exhaust hoods and cooking surfaces, as well as what types of exhaust filters are acceptable for cooking equipment.

The publication also delves into the proper construction for ducts, including how large they should be, and what materials they should be comprised of. The angles at which they produce exhaust outside of the building are also covered.

While these guidelines may seem daunting, they’re actually good for you, the restaurant owner, as it takes much of the guesswork out of how to properly set up a commercial kitchen. They are also designed to keep your property, staff, and customers safe by preventing grease and other fires.

To learn more about being UL-300 compliant and to ensure your fire suppression systems are maintained and cleaned properly, contact Aps-Hoods for a free estimate at (800) 750-7313 in Colorado, California, and elsewhere around the country.

© 2017 Millionairium and Farazandeh.  Authorization to post is granted, with the stipulation that Millionairium and Farazandeh are credited as sole source. Linking to other sites from this document is strictly prohibited, with the exception of herein imbedded links
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