Posts Tagged ‘Hood Installation’

Commercial Hood System | Kitchen Power Cleaning | APS-HOODS | Denver Colorado

How Does a Commercial Hood System Work?

Commercial Hood System – Denver, CO :

A commercial kitchen needs powerful equipment to vent smoke, heat, grease, and food particles away from food and personnel so that they are out of harm’s way. Too much smoke can make the air unbreathable and can lead to poor food quality. Your customers also won’t want to stick around if there is too much soot in the air. Likewise, too much grease and oil can lead to a breakout of fire. This makes a ventilation hood a wise investment for commercial kitchen owners.

Not only is a commercial hood system necessary for safety and health, but you need the proper ventilation equipment to comply with National Fire Protection Association Standard #96, otherwise known as NFPA #96). That’s because commercial vent hood systems are one of your first lines of defense against deadly fire.  

Here is all you have to know about how commercial hood systems work so you can remain up-to-code and protected from fire and poor air quality.

Call APS-Hoods for a free estimate on your Commercial Kitchen Hood Cleaning & Kitchen Exhaust Cleaning needs.

Ventilation Hoods Balance the Air

The primary use of a commercial kitchen vent hood is to remove the foul air and replace it with good, breathable air. The hood itself is located above the cooking appliance. As the appliance does its thing cooking the food, powerful fans will waft all that smoke and debris up through the hood and into the shaft. That is where the magic happens.

From Hood to Fan and Back Again

Every commercial hood system has a powerful exhaust fan that helps to remove the bad air and effluent, which is a fancy word for smoke, grease, heat, and cooking by-products.

The type of fan you have will depend on the appliance you are using, the type of food you cook, and the position of your cooking appliance. Most hoods are positioned overhead, but they can also be wall-mounted.  Ask your ventilation system installation team for details on the type of hood system that is ideal for your commercial kitchen layout.

When the exhaust fan removes the air away from the building, a return air fan will be used to supply make-up air. This is the air that replaces all the cooking effluent so that the air stays breathable, balanced, and safe for customers and staff alike.

As you can imagine, the fans you use have to be powerful enough to remove and replace the air at the proper volumes. Not only that, but your commercial hood system, fans, and ducts help your HVAC system work more easily. After all, can you imagine how much power would be required to force your heating and air conditioning system to fight against grease and smoke to keep your restaurant cool or warm?

All these fans and ducts and your commercial vent hood must work together to keep grease and harmful vapors at bay. As you can imagine, these systems can become soiled and overloaded with grease over time. Most hoods contain grease traps on either side of the hood, and these filters must be cleaned regularly.

You must also ensure that your commercial hood and the vents connected to your hoods and fans are cleaned regularly. Not cleaning your commercial vent hood components can lead to buildup and, eventually, malfunction.

Do you leave the cleaning up to your commercial kitchen staff and possibly your wait staff, as well? You can and many restaurant owners do. However, it is recommended that you combine your staff’s cleaning with professional commercial hood cleaning services. Only then can you be assured that the proper degreasing solutions and equipment will be used to keep your equipment clean and working as it should for years to come.

The Necessity of Commercial Hood Cleaning

You will know that your commercial vent hood system is backed up or not functioning normally when you see more smoke in the air than normal. You may smell foul odors from outside the building, and your HVAC system may seem to be on the fritz.

If you are keeping your restaurant’s grease trap clean, that can help against backups. But make sure you are also keeping your vent hood traps clean. Clean all fan components and use a powerful degreaser on the equipment and in all the interconnecting ducts.

If the front door of your vent hood opens easily without a suction feeling, that is an indication that your commercial hood system is clogged with grease or other debris. Or that your fans aren’t working properly. Either way, it may be time to contact a commercial kitchen vent hood service, who can repair your components and provide you with a full cleaning job, whichever you prefer.

Benefits of Professional Vent Hood Cleaning

Not only will cleaning your commercial hood system keep your kitchen safe and air breathable-clean, but you will save money. An efficient vent hood system uses less energy than one that is clogged and forced to work overtime.

Therefore, to save time, money, and future frustration, contact APS-Hoods, now serving commercial kitchen owners throughout Denver, Colorado. Using the proper equipment and years of experience, we can keep your vent hood system working optimally and cleaned professionally.

Your customers will thank you and you will remain health code and fire code compliant. When your air is pure, the food is untainted and tastes terrific, and you are able to show code inspectors that you have been keeping up with all the necessary ventilation protocols, you’ll be doing yourself a great service for your restaurant’s success.

Are you ready to keep your kitchen safe and the health inspector at bay? Contact us today to receive a free quote in Denver.

Contact Us

    Commercial Hood System
     
    Vent Hood Cleaning | restaurant cleaning services | APS-HOODS | Denver Colorado

    All You Need to Know About Restaurant Hood Maintenance to Protect Your Investment

    Your restaurant hood system controls the ventilation in your commercial kitchen and keeps grease buildup to an absolute minimum. If your vent hood system is not properly maintained, all that grease, debris, and other dirty materials can get kicked into your kitchen’s atmosphere, leading to foul odors permeating your otherwise family-friendly environment while increasing the risks posed by dangerous and deadly fires. Proper maintenance of your systems is key to protecting what’s so very important. Here is all you need to know about vent hood cleaning from time-tested professionals.

    Understanding the Vent Hood System

    When discussing proper restaurant hood maintenance, it’s important to know about each individual component. These are the elements that will need to be thoroughly cleaned and inspected to ensure proper maintenance is performed.

    Extractor Hoods:

    These components are otherwise referred to as exhaust or range hoods. They’re those devices that look like chimneys and hang over the stovetop. Inside the extractor hood is a fan that works to remove all those contaminants that tend to appear in a commercial kitchen, like grease, odors, smells, smoke, and steam. Along with the cleaning and maintenance of the extractor hood, the grease traps of the establishment should also be cleaned thoroughly.

    Hood Filters:

    Also inside the extractor hood lies the hood filter, which also captures airborne particles. Without the filter in place, all those particles would just be kicked back into your kitchen and the air your staff and customers breathe.

    Extractor Fans:

    In many cases, extractor fans will be located within the hood, but that’s not always the case. The fans are tasked with removing old and contaminated air from your kitchen, whereby the stale air will be vented outside and away from the building. These fans are responsible for proper ventilation, which keeps your kitchen at the proper temperatures and limits the risk of fire.

    Exhaust Ducts:

    Otherwise known as grease ducts, these components take the grease, vapors, fumes, and other nasty contaminants outside and away from the building, usually from the rooftop.

    Rooftop Containment Systems:

    When grease accumulates enough, it can get onto and negatively affect the integrity of your restaurant’s roofing. Too much grease can lead to water leaks and fire hazards, just to name two. This means that a rooftop containment system is necessary, as is the maintenance of such a device if you hope to protect your investment. Within the rooftop containment system, you will find a grease runoff system along with a grease trap. These must be emptied out regularly to prevent grease overflow. Ensure the system is waterproof, as well, since rain getting into the grease trap can cause eventual flooding. Your ventilation hood system may contain different parts than the ones listed here. However, the basic concepts will be similar, no matter what type of system your restaurant employs to keep grease and other contaminants at bay. Check with the manufacturer of your vent hood components to get actual figures and dates for proper restaurant hood maintenance. However, the following checklist should give you an excellent guideline to follow.

    Why Proper Hood Maintenance is Necessary

    Scheduling and hiring a crew to maintain your hood system is critical for your business. Here are just three reasons to convince you.

    Avoid Future Repairs:

    When your stove hoods are cleaned and maintained on a regular basis, a professional crew can look for faulty components during every scrub down. You want detail-oriented hood maintenance personnel watching out for your kitchen equipment, which you likely spent big money on. Regular maintenance cuts down on unnecessary repairs and any downtime that may occur if a breakdown happens and you were otherwise completely unaware.

    Enhance System Performance:

    With the expense of owning and maintaining kitchen equipment, you want the most out of each machine and appliance you operate. Proper maintenance ensures there’s no grease build-up that can muck-up even the most powerful of machinery. You’ll keep your fans, vent hoods, and ducts operating at peak efficiency, which has the added benefit of contributing to more energy savings.

    Prolong System Replacement:

    Even well-maintained equipment will need to be replaced ten, fifteen or twenty years down the line. New and better equipment will have been developed by then, so it makes sense that you’d want to remain current with all technology. Not maintaining your equipment, however, can actually shorten the life of your equipment, adding to your expense. You can get peak efficacy and longer life out of all commercial kitchen vent hoods and related equipment by employing professionals who are experienced in restaurant hood maintenance. Here is the schedule the professionals at APS-Hoods.com recommend for the average commercial kitchen establishment.

    Remain Fire Code Compliant

    By engaging in the proper maintenance of your restaurant hood system, you will lower the risk of fire. The National Fire Protection Agency (NFPA) recommends monthly, quarterly, semi-annual and annual inspections, depending on the volume your restaurant is accustomed to producing. Heavy volume restaurants, for example, such as 24-hour establishments, require quarterly maintenance schedules. Meanwhile, low-volume cooking operations, like day camps and churches, can get away with vent hood maintenance checks once per year.

    For Best Results, Engage in Daily Maintenance

    You can enhance the output and life of your kitchen equipment by making a maintenance schedule part of your staff’s nightly closing protocols. While kitchen staff is mopping floors and cleaning dishware, your personnel can also follow a daily vent hood maintenance checklist. A ventilation hood daily maintenance checklist would begin with the removal of all hood filters. The filters should be soaked in a sink or moved through the dishwasher until all buildup has been removed. All stainless-steel surfaces should be wiped down carefully so that no hard surfaces scratch any of the appliances. The cleaner’s job should be to remove all accumulated grease, especially on those surfaces comprising the ventilation hood system. Using a detergent solution, the vent hood system, including the extractor hood, should be wiped down until cleaned thoroughly. A rinsing cloth should then be used, followed by a dry cloth to remove any excess liquid. If this schedule can be maintained on a nightly basis, you’ll save more at the meter while getting the most out of your vent hood equipment, contributing to your business success.

    Monthly Maintenance Schedule

    Each month your business should be in the habit of disposing of any contained grease. Check with your local city to ensure you’re following the proper and legal methods of grease disposal. After the grease has been disposed of, check the container for potential leaks. When you become accustomed to checking for leaks and other defaults on a monthly basis, you cut down on a number of business hazards, including the risk of fire. Your rooftop containment system will need to be checked monthly, as well. This ensures that there is no grease buildup on the roof, which we have already established can be detrimental to your investment. Your duct systems will also be checked for grease buildup and mold growth.

    Quarterly Maintenance Schedule

    A deep clean by a professional restaurant hood maintenance crew is recommended every three or four months. During this cleaning, your vent hood systems will be scrubbed with powerful agents that will simultaneously protect your equipment. The crew will pay special attention to your ducts, grease traps, fans, and filters. The latter will be soaked in heavy degreasing agents or completely replaced to ensure optimum equipment efficiency. A professional crew will also check the bearings in your fans to ensure they are well-lubricated. If the bearings do require lubrication, grease will be added to ensure the fans replace the bad air in your establishment as needed. The crew will clean your vent hood system from roof to kitchen and every inch of duct in-between. The crew will inspect the wiring, fan components, and hood filters to identify potential issues before they get out of hand, leading to potential business shutdowns.

    Yearly Maintenance Schedule

    During a yearly restaurant maintenance inspection, the professional crew will inspect your belts, bearings, and grease. If something needs to be replaced, this is the time to get it done. Learn more about: What Do Commercial Grease Trap Cleaning Services Entail?

    Why Can’t Staff Perform the Monthly, Quarterly & Yearly Maintenance Checks?

    Many business owners, in an effort to save money, ask why their staff can’t perform the necessary maintenance checks. It is possible for staff to do all the degreasing and other dirty work, but you’re putting your business at a distinct disadvantage by trying to cut costs. For one, your staff may not know how each of your vent hood components works. And with how intricate some of those systems can be, only knowing how they all work together can someone properly clean the systems for optimum health and safety.

    Here is how the typical cleaning checklist should go:

    Disassembly:

    In order to clean your restaurant vent hoods and all associated components properly, your entire system should be taken apart. Grease, soot, and debris can hide in the unlikeliest of places, which means that buildup can occur without you realizing how bad it’s getting. The result could be equipment slow-down, breakage, or a dangerous grease fire. A maintenance crew will disassemble all pieces to check for and clean grease.

    Fan Removal:

    All mounted fans will need to be removed in order to clean the shroud and blades of each unit.

    Fan Inspections:

    The fans and their individual components will then be inspected to determine if any blades are loose or belts are worn out. Most of all, every aspect of your vent hood wiring will be inspected to check for frays or otherwise search for problems. A faulty wire could cause your fans to break down. In worse cases, a frayed wire could cause the outbreak of fire.

    Degreasing:

    Each vent hood and fan component, along with will all other stainless-steel appliances, will be thoroughly cleaned until all grease is removed. Even a light sheen of grease could pose a problem down the line. When the cleaning and maintenance crew is finished, you should be able to run a finger along any stainless-steel area of your kitchen without feeling the slightest hint of grease.

    Polish All Ductwork:

    If your staff aren’t keen on cleaning your restaurant’s duct-work, all that grease buildup can lead to contaminated air and deadly fires. Moisture accumulation can also cause mold to grow, putting your staff and customers at further risk. A maintenance and cleaning crew will polish your ductwork so that it’s free of grease and looks as clean as it is.

    Cleaning Certificate:

    A professional crew will sometimes provide you with before and after photos that prove that your ductwork has indeed been cleaned thoroughly and on-schedule. Most if not all companies will provide you with a certificate showing that your ventilation system has been systematically dismantled, scrubbed, de-greased, and maintained. You will have dates and signatures that you can then show to health and fire inspectors.

    Do You Have a Professional Restaurant Vent Hood Maintenance Company in Mind?

    As a business owner, you have a ton invested into your restaurant and the appliances that produce the food that in turn keeps your customers happy. The health of your equipment can spell the difference between business success and one that bleeds money. When you allow grease to build up and equipment to run faulty, you run the risk of breakdowns, business delays, and business-destroying fire. You also put your staff and customers at risk. A professional restaurant hood maintenance crew like APS-Hoods offers impeccable service, the ability to remove grease from every hood component, and peace of mind that comes from knowing that your business is always protected. When you want to maintain a restaurant maintenance schedule you can always count on, contact APS-Hoods in Denver, Aurora, Lakewood, and Centennial, Colorado for a free quote.

    Contact Us

      Exhaust System Cleaning
      Vent Hood Cleaning | APS-HOODS | Denver Colorado

      Signs Your Vent Hood Fans Need Cleaning and/or Replacement

      Source Denver, CO – Vent Hood Cleaning Services Most restaurant owners understand the importance of engaging in a regular commercial kitchen cleaning schedule. Keeping cooktops and food preparation areas spotless is crucial for hygiene reasons, but it’s equally as important to ensure that kitchen hood fans and filters remain just as clean. Here’s why. Grease and dust can build up in range hood fans and filters quickly, posing a potential fire hazard. Grease is highly combustible, so the risk of it catching alight and sparking a kitchen fire are increased if the residue build-up isn’t removed regularly. The kitchen’s hood and ventilation system provide a layer of protection in eliminating air contaminants and odors caused by cooking. So it’s essential the filters and fans are not just cleaned and maintained regularly so they operate effectively; they also need to be cleaned properly, ideally by a professional hood services company, to minimize health and safety risks. However, even with regular maintenance, there are times when a hood fan or filter will need to be replaced completely. Some signs to look for that could indicate a hood fan or filter may need to be replaced include:
      • You notice damage on the filter during a routine cleaning
      • The vent fan no longer draws smoke or cooking smells out of the kitchen as effectively
      • The exhaust fan makes unusual sounds or stops turning completely
      The risk of an exhaust fan failing during operating hours could be devastating to any commercial kitchen operation. The risk of fire is dramatically increased, but there is also the problem of filling the kitchen and dining area with smoke. The specialists at APS-Hoods recommend creating a scheduled routine for cleaning, maintaining and replacing hood filters in every commercial kitchen. The actual length of time between each deep clean, service and replacement will vary, depending on the condition of the individual range hood. A ventilation hood over a busy restaurant kitchen may have filters that need to be replaced every six to eight months. However, that timeframe may shorten if the range hood, duct work and fan are not cleaned and maintained regularly. The majority of commercial kitchen owners simply don’t have the available staff or resources to undertake such a detailed task. In fact, most eateries need their staff to focus on what they do best – cooking great meals and serving satisfied customers. The easiest and most effective way to ensure that any kitchen’s hood, exhaust and ventilation system is operating at its best is to book a complete hood service and duct cleaning. Appointing a professional company to take care of the cleaning allows you to keep your staff focused on their jobs. You also have the peace of mind that the job is done properly and any faulty or damaged parts can be repaired or replaced quickly. To learn more about cleaning the filters in a commercial kitchen, contact Aps-Hoods for a free estimate by calling (800) 750-7313. About Aps-Hoods: Aps-Hoods specializes in services such as complete kitchen cleaning, Vent Hood Cleaning, hood installation, and fire protection services in Denver, Cheyenne, as well as across Colorado, and Wyoming. Authorization to post is granted, with the stipulation that Millionairium and Farazandeh are credited as sole source. Linking to other sites from this document is strictly prohibited, with the exception of herein imbedded links.

      Contact Us

        Vent Hood Cleaning
        Fire Restaurant Safety Tips | APS-HOODS | Denver Colorado

        What you need to know about how to master fire prevention and fire safety restaurant

        Salt Lake City, UT – While restaurants bring a lot of people joy, the fact is they are highly dangerous places. The kitchen is the culprit. Hot equipment, flames, chemicals, and paper products increase the risks of fire significantly. The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) reports that thousands of establishments report fires every year to the tune of hundreds of thousands of dollars per year. In other words, as a restaurant owner, a fire could cost you a significant amount of money and could cost you your business altogether. It’s not worth the risk, especially when there are ways to prevent restaurant fires. Here are the steps to take.

        Install a Fire-Suppression System

        A fire suppression system releases chemicals when it detects a fire. The chemicals suppress the flames, and the system automatically turns off the electrical supply.

        Keep Class K Extinguishers Within Arm’s Reach

        Place K Extinguishers near all areas where fires could start, such as near the stoves and ovens. ABC extinguishers are best for areas where paper, wood, and electrical fires could occur.

        Schedule Inspections Regularly

        Inspections ensure everything is in good working order and there are no fire risks. They should be conducted quarterly unless your restaurant is a high-volume operation. If your kitchen has wood or charcoal burning ovens, you should schedule monthly inspections.

        Train Your Staff

        Fire Restaurant Safety training for staff is important. All staff should have a refresher every six months. Training should include:
        • Fat removal method
        • How to deal with a grease fire
        • Clean the ashes method
        • Where to store flammable liquids
        • The importance of keeping areas tidy
        • An emergency plan

        Maintenance Is Important

        You should have all equipment maintained at least every six months. A Fire Restaurant Safety professional can check for any loose or frayed wires and broken switch plates. A report will identify any fire hazards you’ll need to take care of to pass inspection.

        Schedule Maintenance to Prevent Restaurant Fires

        Is it time for a maintenance and Fire Restaurant Safety inspection appointment? Contact APS-Hoods for professional cleaning, maintenance, and fire protection services. We can protect your business by ensuring your kitchen’s equipment and setup have a low risk of fire. Call us today at 800-750-7313 for a free quote.

        How to Master Fire Prevention in the Workplace

        Denver, CO – Each year, fires cause serious damage to property, sometimes even resulting in injury and death. One of the most effective strategies to protect a building against fire is for management to educate everyone on staff regarding methods of fire prevention and urge them to report any possible fire hazards so that the situation can be handled quickly and properly. Although workplace environments vary, there are some common fire hazards business owners need to be aware of; following are some examples and tips on how to reduce the risk of them causing a fire.

        Flammable Liquids and Vapors:

        This is more of a threat in some environments than others. Particularly at risk are factories and industrial warehouses where large amounts of vapors and flammable liquids are kept. Flammable liquids can ignite immediately when they come into contact with a flame or spark. To decrease the risk of a fire in these areas, always be sure that solvents and flammable liquids are correctly sealed – and if a spill does happen – be sure they are safely and properly cleaned immediately.

        Waste and Combustible Material:

        In many business offices, there is a buildup of trash, paper, and other flammable items that can easily catch fire. If these objects are not discarded on a regular basis, they can provide ample fuel for a dangerous blaze. Avoid stowing rubbish on site as much as possible, or make sure it is in an assigned area, away from main buildings and any possible sources of ignition.

        Overheating Objects:

        In some cases, electrical equipment and machinery warm up during use, providing the potential for a fire. Combustible materials should be kept away from heat sources and unplug any equipment that is not being used whenever possible. Never leave any machinery or electrical equipment turned on overnight unless it is necessary.

        Overloaded Sockets:

        This is a common cause of electrical fires, but it can be easily avoided. A fire can start if faulty extension cords are used or there are too many appliances plugged into the same socket. Use one plugin each socket only, and never use appliances that total more than 3,000 watts or 13amps across the entire socket.

        Faulty Equipment:

        These fires are one of the most common types that occur in the workplace. Encourage staff to be on the lookout for any signs of loose cables or damaged plugs and replace them immediately. All electrical equipment should be checked by an expert technician on a regular basis.

        Human Negligence:

        Unfortunately, one of the most common causes of fires in the workplace is human negligence. Even though the component of human mistakes cannot be completely removed, with proper training business owners can eliminate these errors by providing effective training and guidance for their staff.

        A clean workplace is a safe workplace. For all your commercial cleaning needs in the Denver areas, call APS-Hoods today at (800) 750-7313 to schedule a consultation, or request a free quote online.

        © 2017 Millionairium and Farazandeh. Authorization to post is granted, with the stipulation that Millionairium and Farazandeh are credited as sole source. Linking to other sites from this document is strictly prohibited, with the exception of herein imbedded links.

        Contact Us

          Fire Restaurant Safety
          Fire Suppression Systems | APS-HOODS | Denver Colorado

          Are Your Fire Suppression Systems Compliant? (Classifications of Fire Extinguishers)

          Classifications of Fire Extinguishers

          Salt Lake City, UT – The majority of restaurateurs understand the importance of fire safety in a commercial kitchen. A single fire outbreak has the potential to cost tens of thousands of dollars in damage to a commercial kitchen. There is also the risk of causing injury or loss of life if the fire is not quickly and effectively controlled. Fire systems require much more attention than simply installing a fire extinguisher beside the deep fryer or cooktop. Fires can be sparked by a number of different sources within a kitchen, some of which may require specialized fire systems to extinguish properly. There are several different classifications of fire extinguishers, each suited to fighting fires sparked by different sources.

          How Fire Extinguisher Classifications Work

          Labels on the front of each fire extinguisher display letters that outline the type of fire each system is suited to fight. The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) defines three classes of common fires and another two specialty classes. These are:

          Class A –

          Used to combat fires sparked by common combustible sources such as paper, cardboard boxes, or wood.

          Class B –

          Used to fight high-heat fires fueled by flammable liquids, including gasoline, paint, oil, and other solvents.

          Class C –

          Used to extinguish electrical fires that may have been caused by appliances or motors.

          Class D –

          Used specifically for fighting fires that involve combustible metals, such as titanium, sodium, magnesium, or potassium that have the potential to react violently if doused with water or other chemicals.

          Class K –

          Used specifically for combating fires sparked in cooking appliances or that involve cooking fats or vegetable oils. Standard dry chemicals found in common fire extinguishers are ineffective when trying to extinguish fires in modern cooking appliances, so using specialized fire extinguishers is crucial for improving kitchen safety. Aside from having the correct fire extinguishers and other fire suppression systems in place, commercial kitchen owners can reduce the risk of fire by regularly cleaning and inspecting hood installations, changing grease filters often, and checking that any flammable liquids or chemical solutions are stored properly away from stoves or cooking equipment. All commercial kitchens are required to adhere to national fire testing standard UL-300, which was designed to ensure fires are safely controlled and maintained. A professional fire system service can provide peace of mind that your kitchen’s fire system installation is up to code and that you have the correct classifications of fire extinguishers to suit your kitchen’s needs.

          Are Your Fire Suppression Systems Compliant?

          Commercial kitchen facilities are required to uphold fire testing standard UL-300, a policy that has been in place since 1994. UL stands for Underwriters Laboratories, the organization that created the rules to help commercial kitchens deal with and control property and life-threatening fires. To earn UL 300 certification, which is necessary to secure a Property Insurance policy, Underwriters Laboratories must test and certify each piece of fire suppression equipment independently. The goal is to help restaurants reduce the risk of fires by ensuring that all cooking equipment and the kitchen setup minimizes the collection of grease in the duct-work and the air. Fire extinguishing equipment must also be adequate in handling the severely hot temperatures that can be found in most commercial kitchen equipment.

          UL-300 Certification

          Before 1994, most commercial cooking operations used animal fat and deep fryers that were poorly insulated, resulting in inconsistent and inefficient cooking temperatures. In those days, kitchens used dry chemical systems that would smother a fire if one were to break out.

          Modern Fire Suppression Systems

          These days, kitchens have done away with animal fat and have instead turned to vegetable oils, which tend to heat to cooking temperatures more quickly. The deep fryers used in today’s kitchens retain heat more efficiently and are well-insulated. However, dry chemical systems are no longer used, as they are incapable of extinguishing fires and keeping them extinguished. UL-300 calls for the use of wet chemical fire suppression systems, which serve two primary purposes. First, UL-300 systems still smother fires similar to the way dry chemical extinguishers did. Second, they are designed to cool the liquids so that the fire doesn’t re-ignite, something dry systems were unequipped to do.

          UL-300 Requirements

          If you hope for your commercial kitchen to pass inspection, the following requirements will need to be put into place.
          • Fire extinguishing nozzles should be located in all hoods and ducts, as well as above each cooking appliance.
          • All gas and electrical power sources should have automatic fuel shutoff capabilities.
          • A manual shutoff pull station should be available for all power sources.
          • You should have at least one wet chemical fire extinguishing system that adheres to UL-300 (and that is checked semi-annually by a certified professional).
          • All hoods and ductwork should be maintained and cleaned semi-annually by an authorized service company.
          • Grease filters should be cleaned on a weekly basis.
           

          NFPA 96

          NFPA stands for National Fire Prevention Association, an organization that works to prevent fires in commercial kitchens, and other cooking facilities. The NFPA 96 is a publication that outlines the safety guidelines that restaurant owners can put in place to reduce fire risk. The guidelines include the proper distance and angles for installing exhaust hoods and cooking surfaces, as well as what types of exhaust filters are acceptable for cooking equipment. The publication also delves into the proper construction for ducts, including how large they should be, and what materials they should be comprised of. The angles at which they produce exhaust outside of the building are also covered. While these guidelines may seem daunting, they’re actually good for you, the restaurant owner, as it takes much of the guesswork out of how to properly set up a commercial kitchen. They are also designed to keep your property, staff, and customers safe by preventing grease and other fires. To learn more about being UL-300 compliant and to ensure your fire suppression systems are maintained and cleaned properly, contact Aps-Hoods for a free estimate at (800) 750-7313 in Colorado and around the country.  Authorization to post is granted, with the stipulation that Millionairium and Farazandeh are credited as sole source. Linking to other sites from this document is strictly prohibited, with the exception of herein imbedded links

          Contact Us

            Fire Suppression Systems
            © Copyright APS-Hoods, All Rights Reserved.   Sitemap
                Address: 5925 E. Evans Ave. Suite# 217 Denver , CO 80222 Please send your letters only to suite #215

            Design & SEO by Millionairium

            COVID-19 Precautions: Ask How APS-HOODS Can Protect Your Business from Coronavirus. Call to learn more.Contact us x
            Call Now