Classifications of Fire Extinguishers


Classifications of Fire Extinguishers

Source

Salt Lake City, UT – The majority of restaurateurs understand the importance of fire safety in a commercial kitchen. A single fire outbreak has the potential to cost tens of thousands of dollars in damage to a commercial kitchen. There is also the risk of causing injury or loss of life if the fire is not quickly and effectively controlled.

Fire systems require much more attention than simply installing a fire extinguisher beside the deep fryer or cooktop. Fires can be sparked by a number of different sources within a kitchen, some of which may require specialized fire systems to extinguish properly.

There are several different classifications of fire extinguishers, each suited to fighting fires sparked by different sources.

How Fire Extinguisher Classifications Work



Labels on the front of each fire extinguisher display letters that outline the type of fire each system is suited to fight. The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) defines three classes of common fires and another two specialty classes. These are:

Class A – Used to combat fires sparked by common combustible sources such as paper, cardboard boxes, or wood.

Class B – Used to fight high-heat fires fueled by flammable liquids, including gasoline, paint, oil, and other solvents.

Class C – Used to extinguish electrical fires that may have been caused by appliances or motors.

Class D – Used specifically for fighting fires that involve combustible metals, such as titanium, sodium, magnesium or potassium that have the potential to react violently if doused with water or other chemicals.

Class K – Used specifically for combating fires sparked in cooking appliances or that involve cooking fats or vegetable oils.

Standard dry chemicals found in common fire extinguishers are ineffective when trying to extinguish fires in modern cooking appliances, so using specialized fire extinguishers is crucial for improving kitchen safety.

Aside from having the correct fire extinguishers and other fire suppression systems in place, commercial kitchen owners can reduce the risk of fire by regularly cleaning and inspecting hood installations, changing grease filters often, and checking that any flammable liquids or chemical solutions are stored properly away from stoves or cooking equipment.

All commercial kitchens are required to adhere to national fire testing standard UL-300, which was designed to ensure fires are safely controlled and maintained. A professional fire system service can provide peace of mind that your kitchen’s fire system installation is up to code and that you have the correct classifications of fire extinguishers to suit your kitchen’s needs.

For professional fire system service, hood installation, maintenance, and cleaning, call APS-Hoods at (800)750-7313, now serving customers in Denver, Salt Lake City, Cheyenne, Phoenix, Wyoming, and other across the U.S.

© 2017 Millionairium and Farazandeh. Authorization to post is granted, with the stipulation that Millionairium and Farazandeh are credited as sole source. Linking to other sites from this document is strictly prohibited, with the exception of herein imbedded links.

Tags: , , ,

Trackback from your site.

Leave a comment

© Copyright APS-Hoods, All Rights Reserved.   Sitemap
    Address: 5925 E. Evans Ave. Suite# 216 Denver , CO 80222